The smoking gun that proves the caterpillar theory is correct.

Thanks Josh cartoonsbyjosh.com

Thanks Josh cartoonsbyjosh.com

Roger Tallbloke asked a very sensible question: “So you have evidence of 100kyr swings in volcanicicty? Why haven’t they been spotted before?”

Just to recap, the caterpillar theory says that thermal expansion of the crust leads to tectonic plate movement and that in turns leads to volcanism which precipitates massive pressure-induced warming taking us from the ice-age to the warm inter-glacial we are now in.

When I wrote up the theory in early 2015, there was no such evidence, so I started writing a feeble reply pointing to the change in dust in the ice core and stating that CO2 itself was an indicator of climatic activity – but I thought I ought to just check that nothing had changed since I last looked. And what do I find:

Ancient ice ages linked to volcanic activity and climate change

Two recent studies, one from Harvard and the other from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, both conclude that there has been a very strong correlation between periods of increased worldwide volcanic activity and changes in major glaciations, usually referred to as ice ages*. Stated another way, geological forces definitely influence climate.

This is a major confirmation of Plate Climatology Theory detailed here.

Details of how historical increases in volcanic activity influenced ice ages is still being debated. The debate can be boiled down to one question. What came first, volcanic activity or atmospheric warming? It’s the old “chicken or the egg” conundrum. Harvard and Lamont-Doherty both believe that atmospheric temperature changes occurred first and that these changes led to / caused changes in volcanic activity.

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7 Responses to The smoking gun that proves the caterpillar theory is correct.

    • Scottish-Sceptic says:

      Thanks. Not sure how to respond. There is good evidence over time-scales as long as the ice-age but I’ve no real idea how short a period of warming could trigger the effect.

      • James B McGinn says:

        I just thought you’d find it interesting. Japan, Ecuador, Pacific rim, Volcanic activity. It seems like these things come in waves.

        • Scottish-Sceptic says:

          You’re thinking of tsunamis!

          By the way, what do you know about Henry’s law?

          • James B McGinn says:

            Well, I don’t claim any intimate knowledge or experience with it. I just looked it up on wikipedia, it seems to make sense. I guess it refers to the solubility of gases in liquid H2O. Why?

          • Scottish-Sceptic says:

            It’s OK I think I have the ansewr.

  1. TedL says:

    another interesting observation in support of the plate climatology theory – https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/04/27/weather-pattern-changes-over-greenland-may-account-for-melting-storms-in-europe/#comment-2201337

    Vukevic shows a correlation between seismic events in Iceland with North Atlantic sea surface temperature.

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